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Leskovac

Serbia, Leskovac
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Downtown Leskovac
"Leskovac" (Serbian Cyrillic: Лесковац) is a city and municipality located in southern Serbia at 43.00° North, 21.95° East. It is the administrative center of the Jablanica District of Serbia. Leskovac is accessible from Belgrade by the E75 motorway to Thessaloniki in Greece.

History
Archeological finds from 2005 show that Triballians lived in the area before the Romans came in the 1st century, there are several graves found at the Hisar Hill.


Old Leskovac
In 1860, "Leskovac" was the second largest city (after Belgrade) in the Principality of Serbia but was ruled as a kaza (township) until 1878. In 1867 the Principality secured the removal of Ottoman army garrisons from the cities, acquiring sovereingty, which was internationally recognised at the Congress of Berlin in 1878. Full independence from the Ottoman Balkans initially had a negative impact on trade. However, by the end of the 19th century, the town of Leskovac was famous across the Balkans for its workshops which turned hemp into rope. Leskovac was known as Leskofça during Ottoman rule and was bounded to Niş sanjak until 1878.


Soon there were three watermill-driven lace producers in the region. In 1896, the founders of these companies pooled their resources and bought factory equipment for the production of woollen cloth from the German Empire. This was the first factory on the outskirts of the town. In 1903, a factory for hemp processing was built on the riverbank north of the old town centre. In 1922, the Teokarevic family opened a wool cloth factory in the small town of Vucje near Leskovac. By 1938, the private textile factories of Leskovac town employed 2,560 workers
In the 1870s, there were thousands of hemp-processors in Leskovac, producing up to 150,000 cartloads per year.



Monument of Liberty "WWI"

The city, initially known as Dubočica, was once known as "Little Manchester", because of its 19th century textile industry which was second only to that of Manchester, England. The city continued to be a major textile center until the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe, but due to the economic isolation of Serbia resulting from ethnic wars, its remote location, and failure to privatize the mills, the industry collapsed resulting in depression of the economy in the area. "A Serbian Region Unravels With Its Textile Industry", article by Nicholas Wood in the New York Times, January 29, 2007

orld War I
During World War II, the city was part of Nedić"s Serbia. It was heavily bombed by the Allies in 1944, with estimates of civilian casualties varying from over a thousand to six thousand.

Fitzroy Maclean the head of the British military mission to the Partisans wrote " ..... as we watched the whole of Leskovac seemed to rise bodily in the air in a tornado of dust and smoke and debris, and a great rending noise fell on our ears. ..... What was left of Leskovac lay enveloped in a pall of smoke; several buildings seemed to be burning fiercely. Even the Partisans seemed subdued." This was part of Operation Ratweek to attack the enemy withdrawal, and air reconnaissance had confirmed the presence of a strong concentration of armour and motor transport there, although he said the use of 50 ‘Heavies’ or Flying Fortresses did seem "rather like taking a sledge-hammer to crack a walnut." .

Kosovo Conflict
On 12 April 1999, during the NATO bombing of Yugoslavia a bridge near Leskovac (Grdelička klisura) was destroyed by a NATO aircraft as a passenger train was crossing. The act was highly condemned with the bridge being struck twice (the train itself having been bombed from the first attack).

Panoramic view of Leskovac from Hisar Hills
Population through history

*1900: 13,641
*1905: 13,647
*1910: 14,266
*1921: 15,250
*1931: 17,632
*1941: 20,500 (estimate)
*1948: 20,913
*1953: 24,553
*1961: 34,396
*1971: 45,478
*1981: 67,110
*1991: 72,487
*2002: 94,758 (110.240)


emographics of the municipalit
river view trade court
Siroka carsija by night, seen from S15 Tower
Ethnic groups in the municipality (2002 census):
*Serbs = 155,011
*Roma = 4.327
*Other-Unkonown

emographics of the tow
In 2002 the town"s population was 94,758of whom the majority are primarily Serbs (89,125). Other significant ethnic groups are Roma (4,327), Macedonians (168), Yugoslavs (108), and others (including Greeks, Bulgarians, etc). In January 2007, there were an estimated 500 persons of Chinese origin living in Leskovac. "Discussion Paper: The cost of non-Europe. Textile towns and the future of Serbia," European Stability Initiative, January 18, 2007, at http://www.esiweb.org/index.php?lang=en&id=156&document_ID=83

At one time the second largest city in Serbia, today Leskovac is blighted by economic problems with many working age people migrating out of the area. "A Serbian Region Unravels With Its Textile Industry", article by Nicholas Wood in the New York Times, January 29, 2007

Subdivisions
City downtown

The city proper of Leskovac is divided into the following local communities (месне заједнице or "mesne zajednice"):
*Lamele (Ламеле)
*Radničko (Радничко)
*Dubočica (Дубочица)
*Centar (Центар)
*Morava (Морава)
*Hisar (Хисар)
*Prva južnomravska brigada (Прва јужноморавска бригада)
*Rade Žunić (Раде Жунић)
*Marko Crni (Марко Црни)
*Kosta Stamenković (Коста Стаменковић)
*Veljko Vlahović (Вељко Влаховић), named after a Serbian-Montenegrin Communist
*Milentije Popović (Милентије Поповић), named after a Serbian Communist
*Stojan Ljubić (Стојан Љубић)
*Moša Pijade (Моша Пијаде), named after a Serbian-Jewish Communist

Dieser Artikel stammt aus der freien Enzyklopädie Wikipedia und kann dort bearbeitet werden. Der Text ist unter der Lizenz Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike verfügbar. Fassung vom 08.03.2021 14:15 von den Wikipedia-Autoren.
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