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Bray

Ireland, Bray
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"Bray" (, formerly "Brí Chualann") is a town in north , Ireland. It is a busy urban centre and seaside town of approximately 32,000 people, making it the fourth largest town in Ireland (excluding the five cities). It is situated about south of Dublin on the east coast.

The town is the location of some industry, is home for many who commute to Dublin by car or rail, is a market town for the surrounding area and still attracts tourists particularly from Dublin at weekends. The town straddles the Dublin-Wicklow border, with a portion of the northern suburbs situated in County Dublin. Bray is home to Ireland"s only dedicated film studios, Ardmore Studios where films such as Excalibur, Braveheart, and Breakfast on Pluto have been shot.
Bray seafront and Bray Head

istor
In medieval times, Bray was on the border of the coastal district, governed directly by the English crown from Dublin Castle, known as the Pale. Inland, the countryside was under the control of Gaelic Chieftains, such as the O"Toole and O"Byrne clans. Bray features on the 1598 map by Abraham Ortelius as "Brey". (It is worth noting the "O Byrne" name appearing prominently on the map). In August or September 1649 Oliver Cromwell is believed to have stayed in Bray on his way to Wexford from Dublin. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Bray was still a small fishing village, but during the latter part of the 18th century, the Dublin middle classes began to move to Bray to escape city life, while still being relatively close to the city.
The Dublin and Kingstown Railway, the first in Ireland, opened in 1834 and was extended as far as Bray in 1854. With the railway, the town grew to become the largest Irish seaside resort. The outbreak of World War II put the industry "on hold" for its duration. However, during the 1950s tourists from England, Scotland and Northern Ireland returned to Bray in great numbers to escape the austerity of post-war rationing. The town"s career as a resort declined from the 1960s onwards when foreign travel became an option for large numbers of people. However, the town is still popular with visitors who come to enjoy the seafront with its bars and restaurants,the mile long beach and the scenic walks on Bray head.

eograph
The town as seen from Bray Head.
Bray is the ninth largest town in Ireland with a population of 31,901 inhabitants, as of the 2006 Census.

The River Dargle enters the sea here, from a source near Kippure, in the Wicklow Mountains. Bray Head is the situated at the southern end of the promenade and a well-worn track leads to the summit. The rocks of Bray Head are a mixture of greywackes and quartzite. The coastal railway line continues south from Bray along the seaward slopes of Bray Head. At the summit of Bray Head is a large concrete cross, visible from the famous Victorian promenade, which is regularly walked by locals and visitors.

The town is situated on the coast; Shankill, County Dublin lies to the north, and Greystones, to the south. The picturesque village of Enniskerry lies to the west of the town, at the foot of the Wicklow Mountains.

ocal governmen
Bray is governed by a town council, but before the Local Government Act 2001 it was an urban district. Part of the northern Bray area lies within the county of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, despite its seamless integration with the rest of the town. The border between and County Dublin lies along Old Conna / Corke Abbey, thereby making all areas north of that point "Bray, County Dublin".

Bray is the only town council to have twelve members in recognition of its size. Like Dundalk, Sligo and Drogheda, Bray also uses a ward system.

The area around the Southern Cross Road to the south of Bray is not included in the area governed by Bray Town Council, but by Wicklow County Council.

ranspor
Bray Daly Railway Station.
A substantial public transport network, both north into Dublin and south into and County Wexford, serves the town. Bray is on the DART Rail Network which stretches north to Malahide and Howth and south to Greystones. The town is also on the mainline Iarnród Éireann Rail Network which connects north to Connolly Station in Dublin city centre and further to Drogheda and Dundalk. To the south, the rail line goes through Arklow, Gorey and Rosslare Europort. Bray"s train station is named after Edward Daly, an executed leader of the 1916 Easter Rising. Bray Daly Station was opened on 10 July 1854.

Four bus companies pass through Bray; Dublin Bus, Bus Éireann, Finnegan"s Bray and St. Kevin"s Bus Service to Glendalough. Dublin Bus is by far the biggest operator with frequent services to and from Dublin City centre and many services within the greater Bray area. Dublin Bus also provides services to Dún Laoghaire, Enniskerry, Greystones, Kilmacanogue, Kilcoole and Newtownmountkennedy.

There are plans to extend the Luas light rail system to Fassaroe, an area of development on the town"s western periphery. However, the exact connection between the Luas and the town centre railway station has yet to be decided. Until 1958, the old Harcourt Street railway line ran from Harcourt Street in Dublin to Bray, along much of the route of the new Luas.

Bray lies along the M11 motorway corridor; an interchange at its northern side links with the M50 Dublin bypass.

ourist facilitie
Hillwalkers at the cross on the summit of Bray Head.
Bray is a long-established holiday resort with numerous hotels and guesthouses, shops, restaurants and evening entertainment. The town also plays host to a number of high-profile festival events.

Available in the vicinity are fifteen 18-hole golf courses, tennis, fishing, sailing and horse riding. Other features of Bray are the amusement arcades and games centre. There is also a leisure centre on Quinsboro Road and a National Sealife Centre on Strand Road. Bray is known as the "Gateway to Wicklow" and is the longest established seaside town in the country. It has a safe beach of sand and shingle to walk on, which is over long, fronted by a spacious esplanade. Bray Head, which rises steeply ( above the sea, dominates the scene, affording views of mountains and sea. The concrete cross at the top of the head was erected in 1950 for the holy year. The name of the town means "hill" or "rising ground", possibly referring to the gradual incline of the town from the Dargle bridge to Vevay Hill.

Bray is a popular base for walkers, ramblers and strollers. It is notable for its mile-long promenade which stretches from the harbour, with its colony of Mute Swans, to Bray Head at the southern end of the promenade - from where a well worn track leads to the summit. Also very popular with walkers is the Cliff Walk along Bray Head out to Greystones (as of April 2009, the Cliff Walk is officially closed, although actually passable, to walkers due to the risk of rock falls and subsidence).

The annual Bray Summerfest is an established tourist event, taking place over six weeks in July and August. The Summerfest features over 100 free entertainment events, including live music, markets, sporting entertainment, carnivals, and family fun. Performers who have headlined include Mundy, Brian Kennedy, The Undertones, The Hothouse Flowers, and Mary Black. In 2006, over 60,000 visitors attended the main festival weekend in mid-July.

Bray also hosts one of the largest carnival and festival events to celebrate the annual St Patrick"s holiday. The Bray St Patrick"s Carnival & Parade is presented by Bray & District Chamber and is a five-day festival of carnival fun, parades, and live entertainment.

Bray hosts an annual international jazz festival on the May bank holiday weekend each year. Described by The Irish Times as "the connoisseur"s jazz festival", Bray Jazz has established itself as one of the main events taking place each year on the Irish jazz calendar. Established in 2000, the festival includes performances by leading-name jazz and world music artists from Ireland and abroad.

In January 2010, Bray was named the "Cleanest town in Ireland" in the 2009 Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) survey of 60 towns and cities.

People
Swans where the Dargle flows into the harbour.
Born in Bray:
*Eddie Jordan, founder of Jordan Formula 1 racing team.
*Eva Birthistle, actress
*Dara Ó Briain, comedian
*Paul McNaughton, Ireland rugby team manager
*Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh, former Attorney General, Chief Justice, and President of Ireland (1974-1976)
*Darren Randolph, a professional soccer player currently playing for Charlton Athletic.
*Laura Whitmore, MTV presenter.
Lived in Bray:
*Isaac Weld, famous explorer and author lived in Ravenswell, Bray from 1813 to 1856.
*Chief Justice of Ireland, Thomas Langlois Lefroy, spent the last three years of his life (from 1866 to 1869) in Newcourt, Bray.Lefroy, T. 1871, Memoir of Chief Justice Lefroy, Hodges, Foster & Co., Dublin.
*James Joyce lived in One Martello Terrace, Bray (a house that is now the home of Labour Party deputy leader, Liz McManus) for part of his childhood, from 1887 to 1891. The house next door, Two Martello Terrace, also had its share of well-known residents, including singer Mary Coughlan, composer Roger Doyle and film director and author Neil Jordan and his then partner Beverly D"Angelo.
*During the 1980s U2 star Bono owned the Martello Tower after which the terrace is named.
*The late comedy star Dave Allen lived in the town for a time, as did the RTÉ News journalist Charlie Bird.
*Ed Joyce, Middlesex and England cricket star grew up in Bray and began his cricket career on the pitches at Aravon school.
*Mercury Prize-nominated folk singer Fionn Regan was brought up in the area, which frequently gets a mention in his lyrics.
*Former Ireland and Leinster player Reggie Corrigan, hails from Bray and attended Presentation College.
*Oscar Wilde, Victorian poet, playwright and author, owned property on the Esplanad Terrace and is thought to have lived there for a time.
*Other well-known residents of the town include FM104 talk-show host and Dublin DJ Adrian Kennedy, singer Sinéad O"Connor, wildlife filmmaker Éamon de Buitléar, broadcaster Brian Farrell, music writer and singer Phil Coulter, musical star Colm Wilkinson, novelist Anne Enright (winner of the 2007 Booker prize) and poet David Wheatley.

ducatio
rimary school
*Scoil Chualann.
*Saint Andrew"s National School.
*Saint Fergal"s Junior National School.
*Saint Fergal"s Senior National School.
*Bray School Project National School.
*Saint Cronan"s Boys National School.
*Saint Patrick"s Loreto National School.
*Saint Lee"s National School.
*Gaelscoil Uí Chéadaigh.
*Saint Peter"s Boys National School.
*Saint Philomena"s National School, Ravenswell.

ost primary school
*Presentation College.
*Saint Kilian"s Community School.
*Saint Thomas" Community School.
*Saint Brendan"s College
*Loreto Convent.
*Saint Gerard"s School.
*Coláiste Ráithín.
*Language College Ireland.

port
*Bray Wanderers AFC.
* Lawn Tennis Club.
*GAA
*
*
*Saint Fergal"s AFC.
*
*
*
*Bray Divers Scuba Diving Club
*

Charitable organisations
*Bray Lions Club.
*Saint Vincent de Paul Society.
*Five Loaves.
Bray Cancer Support and Information Centre

Churches
*Church of the Most Holy Redeemer.
*Queen of Peace.
*Saint Fergal"s Church.
*Saint Peter"s Church.
*Christ Church.
*Crinken Church.

nternational relation

win towns — Sister citie
Bray is twinned with:
* Bègles, France.
* Würzburg, Germany.
* Dublin, California.

ee als
* List of towns and villages in Ireland
* Market Houses in Ireland
* History of rail transport in Ireland
* Christ Church, Bray
* Bray Jazz Festival

aller

Image:Bray01.JPG | Bray from Bray Head
Image:Braydart.JPG |Bray Daly Station
Image:Stpatricksdatbray.JPG |St. Patrick"s Day 2008
Image:BrayHeadSummit040207.jpg |Bray Head Summit
Image:Presbray.jpg |Pres Bray
Image:Bray from Bray Head.jpg|Bray from Bray Head
Image:Cronan"s New School.jpg|St Cronan"s BNS



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Category:Bray
Category:Towns and villages in
Category:Beaches of the Republic of Ireland
Category:Towers in the Republic of Ireland

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Dieser Artikel stammt aus der freien Enzyklopädie Wikipedia und kann dort bearbeitet werden. Der Text ist unter der Lizenz Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike verfügbar. Fassung vom 20.08.2019 03:47 von den Wikipedia-Autoren.
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